Monthly Archives

October 2014

by Dan Girmus Film

The Overnighters | Jesse Moss

Few current documentaries seem as of-the-moment as Jesse Moss’s The Overnighters, a film shot through with pulsating clarity and startling ambition. It follows Jay Reinke, a Lutheran pastor in Williston, N.D., as he faces increasing hostility from townspeople toward his “Overnighter” program, which allows…

October 10, 2014
by Peter Labuza Film

Whiplash | Damien Chazelle

There’s a moment near the end of the second act of Damien Chazelle’s sophomore feature Whiplash that threatens to completely derail the narrative: a character gets into what looks like a fatal car accident and keeps moving like he’s the Terminator. But that moment…

October 10, 2014
by Chris Mello Film

Annabelle | John R. Leonetti

The success of James Wan’s The Conjuring last year, like that of Paranormal Activity back in 2009, points to a wave of purely affective horror cinema, less concerned with feeding on social anxieties of their time than with crafting jump scares and a spooky…

October 9, 2014
by Matt Lynch Film

Gone Girl | David Fincher

David Fincher’s Gone Girl immediately announces its intentions to deconstruct everyday images with a deceptive opening-credits sequence consisting of shots of empty houses, “for sale” signs, back alleys, and closed-up storefronts. Sure, there could be a socioeconomic subtext, some “How We Live Now” statement…

October 3, 2014
by 
Drew Hunt Film

Men, Women & Children | Jason Reitman

Jason Reitman’s latest Oscar shill, the formally inert and thematically overconfident Men, Women & Children, aspires to illustrate how humans — horny high school students and their horny parents, specifically — interact in this new technological world of ours. The characters are all but glued to the computers…

October 3, 2014
In Review | Online film and music criticism