Daily Archives

December 17, 2015

by Charles Lyons-Burt Film

Creed | Ryan Coogler

December 17, 2015
creed

Ryan Coogler’s Rocky spin-off Creed begins, evocatively, in a juvenile corrections facility. A handsomely framed shot depicts a line of African-American boys filing through a gated door, before the camera pushes into the room on the other side where a fight has broken out. At the center is our young protagonist, Donny Johnson, née Adonis Creed (Alex Henderson here, Michael B. Jordan as a man). Soon, Don is whisked off to an antithetically plush life in a mansion with his…

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Blockbuster Beat by Matt Lynch Film

The Big Short | Adam McKay

December 17, 2015
The Big Short (2015)

News to absolutely nobody: in 2008 a mounting, toxic combination of sheer cluelessness and outright lawbreaking caused the US housing market to collapse, leading to a massive taxpayer-funded government bailout of several enormous financial institutions. In the wake of this, very little new legislation was presented to avoid a similar future problem, virtually nobody was punished (except for, you know, the average citizen who lost a job or home or saw their savings decimated), and everyone went back to business…

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by Ty Landis Film

James White | Josh Mond

December 17, 2015
James White (2015)

A stain of blood remains on a shower window after a night of debauchery, a son miles away from home tells his mother, “I love you” on the phone in a subtle register that suggests a history of tenderness and an immediate obligation of proximity between the two. The blood and the phone call can be read as mostly unrelated moments but they exist as remnants of lived-in experience rather than broad strokes, each aiding in our understanding of the…

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by Willow Catelyn Maclay Film

Carol | Todd Haynes

December 17, 2015
Carol - 2015

Like someone’s old love letters or the keepsake wilted flowers of a first love, Carol has the feel of a kind of attic picture that’s been sitting and collecting dust for years, an appropriate matching of form and function. Shot on grainy 16mm, director Todd Haynes prefers a faded color palette that evokes an aged quality in the film’s images. The film feels less like an homage to the melodramas of the 1950s and more like it was actually filmed there—an observance…

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