Monthly Archives

November 2018

#PopRocks by Calum Reed Music

Mariah Carey | Caution

It’s often been said that Mariah Carey has little humility, but how much of that is just for show? Four years on from the flamboyantly-titled Me. I Am Mariah… The Elusive Chanteuse — a commercial failure, though one modest critical acclaim — Mimi is…

November 27, 2018
#KickingtheCanon by Paul Attard Music

Najma | Qareeb

British-born Najma Akhtar never intended to become a singer; she followed in the footsteps of her parents and graduated with a masters in Chemical Engineering from Aston University. It wasn’t until Najma visited distant relatives in Najibabad, India, and learned Urdu, that she picked up the vocal tradition of spiritual poems…

November 22, 2018
#BlockbusterBeat by Matt Lynch Film

Creed II | Steven Caple Jr.

Whereas 2015’s Creed transcends its station as essentially the seventh Rocky due in large part to director Ryan Coogler’s reliance on his actors’ emotional intelligence, and his ability to balance character nuance and broad narrative strokes, Creed II resembles not much more than a generic Rocky sequel. Coogler’s out, and new director Steven Caple Jr. abandons the complex…

November 21, 2018
#StreamingScene by Matthew Lucas Film

Cam | Daniel Goldhaber

A suspicious charge on a credit card, a call from the bank — few among us haven’t experienced this. Mostly the notifications cause minor inconvenience, but that isn’t always the case. Set in the world of “cam-girls” — women who perform sexual acts in online chat…

November 19, 2018
#StreamingScene by Zach Lewis Film

Zama | Lucrecia Martel

Antonio di Benedetto’s novel, Zama, is renowned for its simplicity, with most paragraphs a mere sentence in length; Lucrecia Martel’s film adaptation is full of detail. Where di Benedetto cuts descriptions short (even principal characters are dubbed “mulatto”), Martel fills every extended shot with sumptuous color…

November 19, 2018
#StreamingScene by Lawrence Garcia Film

The Wild Boys | Bertrand Mandico

The Wild Boys opens with a shimmering black-and-white title card, an homage to Kenneth Anger’s Fireworks, and voiceover that soon takes the viewer back to the violent origin of this delirious, gender-bending tale. Fueled by an impulse dubbed only “TREVOR” (which may stand in…

November 19, 2018
In Review | Online film and music criticism