Feature Articles

by InRO Staff Feature Articles Film Year in Review

Top 10 Films of 2018 (So Far)

July 10, 2018
HalftimeFilm

Yesterday, we presented our Top 10 Albums of the Year (So Far). Today, we do the same for film — which also gives us the chance to offer takes on some films that haven’t been covered in our regular Blockbuster Beat reviews. (In fact, not a single “blockbuster” made the list, unless you count that dog movie we failed to review during its release.) Generally speaking, our best films of 2018 are actually from 2017: festival premieres from Toronto, Cannes, Sundance, etc. that took…

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by InRO Staff Feature Articles Music Year in Review

Quick Takes on Albums 2018 – Halftime (Part 3)

July 6, 2018
XXXTentacion

All this week at In Review Online, we’re presenting our takes on some notable (and less notable) albums that saw release during the first six months of the year. In the third of four installments (find the first one here and the second one here), we look at some recently released albums, which means we finally wade into the G.O.O.D. Music release cycle conversation that’s been dominating industry discourse. We also grapple with the presumably final album from controversial rapper XXXTentacion, who was shot and killed on…

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by InRO Staff Feature Articles Music Year in Review

Quick Takes on Albums 2018 – Halftime (Part 2)

July 4, 2018
Halftime2

All this week at In Review Online, we’ll be presenting our takes on some notable (and less notable) albums that saw release during the first six months of the year, more or less chronologically. In the second of four installments (find the first one here), we look primarily at spring 2018 releases, including a career summative statement from dream-pop duo Beach House; a major rap debut from former reality TV star Cardi B; a record-breaking album from K-pop boy band BTS; and more.…

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by InRO Staff Feature Articles Music Year in Review

Quick Takes on Albums 2018 – Halftime

July 3, 2018
Halftime1

All this week at In Review Online, we’ll be presenting our takes on some notable (and less notable) albums that saw release during the first six months of the year, more or less chronologically. In the first of four installments, we look at quarter one 2018 releases, including a strong feminist statement from ’90s alterna-pop hero Tracey Thorn; Justin Timberlake’s failed-experiment pop blockbuster; the long awaited return of ’90s indie-rock heroes the Breeders; and plenty of others.…

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by Odie Henderson Feature Articles Music

Isaac Hayes, the Way Nature Intended: Hot Buttered Soul, Shaft, and Black Moses

April 2, 2018
hayes

On February 23rd, Craft Recordings issued remasters of three classic Isaac Hayes albums, 1969’s Hot Buttered Soul and 1971’s Shaft and Black Moses. Each has been carefully restored and pressed to vinyl, the way nature intended, with their memorable album covers also meticulously recreated. The trilogy documents Hayes’s journey from Stax Records producer and songwriter to legendary performer in his own right, taking the listener through over three hours of classic soul jams that range from the eerily quiet to…

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by Kyle Turner Feature Articles Music

Eat, Survive, Make Music: An Interview With Joe Benjamin

January 12, 2017
JB

If Damien Chazelle’s recent film La La Land essentially uses its every frame to try and justify its pastiche nature, through a sense of disenchantment, then Joe Benjamin & a Mighty Handful is the kind of band that doesn’t really feel it necessary to make that kind of effort; they just let themselves be there for the audience that wants them to be. And if you’re with their freewheeling, kind of kookie frontman (who recalls Alan Cumming in Bob Fosse’s Cabaret), then head to one…

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by Simon Abrams Feature Articles Music

ZAPPAtite Is a Dish Best… Not Served at All

October 13, 2016
LOS ANGELES, CA - MARCH 25:  Singer songwriter Frank Zappa poses for a portrait in the editing room of his Laurel Canyon home on March 25, 1972 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Ed Caraeff/Getty Images)

“One of these days, I’m going to erase all the tapes in the world. Tomorrow I may do it. All the Frank Zappa masters: nothing, blank, empty space.” —Frank Zappa, “Are You Hung Up?”  What would the world be like if ZAPPAtite, a new best-of compilation of music by poly-generic composer/prodigy Frank Zappa, served as its primary method of Zappa education? This is (hopefully) my less aggro way of asking, “Who needs this fucking thing anyway?” ZAPPAtite, a concept proposed…

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by Sam C. Mac Feature Articles Film Retrospective Film

Retrospective | Sion Sono: Love Leaves Destruction in Its Wake

August 2, 2016
Play in Hell

Sion Sono, known to most as a director of brutally violent films like 2002’s Suicide Club, can claim at least three titles in his filmography that contain the word “love.” The best of these, and indeed the 54-year-old Japanese iconoclast’s masterpiece-to-date, is 2011’s Love Exposure, a four-hour exorcism of acrimonious attitudes toward his country’s relationship to religion, pornography, its youth, the obediences of family and class, and perhaps above all—and representative of each—the expectation of good taste.…

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by Simon Abrams Feature Articles Film

Why Haven’t You Heard of Kabali?

July 25, 2016
kabali 2

Kabali is an Indian gangster film, and the star vehicle for Tamil Nadu star Rajinikanth, the second highest paid Asian actor after Jackie Chan. Rajinikanth is big, but not in the eyes of the Western world; there are several practical reasons for this, chief among them being the sad state of representation/coverage of Indian films in the American/British/English-language press.…

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by Tina Hassannia Feature Articles Film Retrospective Film

Retrospective | Abbas Kiarostami (1940-2016)

July 6, 2016
Kiarostami

Originally published August 15th, 2011 One of the most important filmmakers of the last 30 years emerged from a country famous for its brutal censorship, a nation that forces many artists to take up residence elsewhere if they wish to freely pursue their craft or, in some cases, even if they just want to stay alive. These unfortunate conditions turned out to be serendipitous for Abbas Kiarostami…

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by John Oursler Feature Articles Film

Selects from BAMcinématek’s Booed at Cannes Series

May 13, 2013
Under the Sun of Satan

As the world’s sole “industry only” film festival, Cannes stands alone in that the first audiences to see each film are not a mix of industry and common-folk, but rather only those most privy to the ins and outs of the moviemaking machine. There are pros and cons to this: While Cannes is known to invite films from emerging talents or visionary auteurs, the viewers of those films have a different threshold for, and interest in, what they’re watching. If…

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