Features

by InRO Staff Features

Top 10 Films of 2016

December 31, 2016
happy-hour

It’s heartening to realize that in a year of seemingly constant death—one in which the passing of great filmmakers was no exception—the best films here seemed intent on never forgetting those losses, to mine the past and the passed for new inspiration in the present, and in movingly reverent ways. Our great new filmmakers looked to the old ones to guide them…

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by InRO Staff Features

Top 10 Performances of 2016

December 30, 2016
lily

Our top 25 performances, before whittling it down to the 10 you’ll find below, featured votes for two actors from Manchester by the Sea, two from Toni Erdmann, four from Happy Hour, four from Certain Women, and a hefty five from Moonlight. A twist on a typical year’s voting trends which may…

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by InRO Staff Features

Top 10 Albums of 2016

December 29, 2016
chance

In a year most of us would rather forget for one reason or another, 2016 was welcomingly giving when it came to dispensing albums from some of both this and last century’s greatest performers. The sheer wealth of material this year means fantastic work like Leonard Cohen’s swan song, Young Thug’s most cohesive effort to date, and The Avalanches nearly two-decades-in-the-making second album won’t get the expanded…

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by InRO Staff Features

Top 10 Songs of 2016

December 29, 2016
formation

Just another year gone by—except songs seemed particularly vital for getting through these last 12 months. Not that you need me to tell you, but we lost some of our greatest purveyors of the form in 2016, and if the 10 selections below can’t compensate—if there’s no “Kiss” or “Mama Tried” or “Modern Love” among them—most look struggle, and sacrifice, and the indefatigable march of time, head-on, as much a reflection of their times as the classics that came before them. And if a few…

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by Lawrence Garcia Features Festival Coverage

Vancouver Film Festival 2016 – Future // Present

October 28, 2016
werewolf

One of the most exciting developments of this year’s Vancouver International Film Festival was the introduction of Future // Present, a program focused on new films from emerging Canadian filmmakers. Curated by critic and programmer Adam Cook, the eight films shown—from predominantly first-time feature filmmakers—were diverse in form and content, ranging from narrative fiction…

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by Lawrence Garcia Features Festival Coverage

Vancouver Film Festival 2016 – Dispatch 3

October 20, 2016
tower

The 35th Vancouver International Film Festival wrapped on October 14th, capping a two–week marathon of cinema gorging. This third and final dispatch covers two acclaimed holdovers from the Locarno Film Festival, The Dreamed Path and The Human Surge; films from Eugene Green (Son of Joseph) and Hong Sangsoo (Yourself and Yours); a writer biopic, Nelly, from French-Canadian…

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by Lawrence Garcia Features Festival Coverage

Vancouver Film Festival 2016 – Dispatch 2

October 14, 2016
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The 35th Vancouver International Film Festival is past its halfway point and continues to deliver a refreshingly varied cinematic slate. This second dispatch covers three less-heralded films from the fest’s Dragons & Tigers program, and two higher-profile world cinema titles, the Olivier Assayas ghost story Personal Shopper and Terence Davies’ Emily Dickinson biopic A Quiet Passion. Also covered in this dispatch are…

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by Simon Abrams Features

ZAPPAtite Is a Dish Best… Not Served at All

October 13, 2016
LOS ANGELES, CA - MARCH 25:  Singer songwriter Frank Zappa poses for a portrait in the editing room of his Laurel Canyon home on March 25, 1972 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Ed Caraeff/Getty Images)

“One of these days, I’m going to erase all the tapes in the world. Tomorrow I may do it. All the Frank Zappa masters: nothing, blank, empty space.” —Frank Zappa, “Are You Hung Up?”  What would the world be like if ZAPPAtite, a new best-of compilation of music by poly-generic composer/prodigy Frank Zappa, served as its primary method of Zappa education? This is (hopefully) my less aggro way of asking, “Who needs this fucking thing anyway?” ZAPPAtite, a concept proposed…

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by Lawrence Garcia Features Festival Coverage

Vancouver Film Festival 2016 – Dispatch 1

October 10, 2016
viff1

Coming just two weeks after the end of the 2016 Toronto Film Festival, the 35th Vancouver International Film Festival (September 29th – October 14th) boasts an impressive lineup, showcasing a huge number of world cinema’s major titles (including some, such as Alain Guiraudie’s Staying Vertical and Eugene Green’s Son of Joseph, that skipped TIFF) in addition to its typically strong Dragons & Tigers program, dedicated to East Asian cinema (which this year includes…

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by InRO Staff Features Festival Coverage

Toronto Film Festival 2016 – Dispatch 2

September 26, 2016
nocturama-banner

The 41st Toronto International Film Festival recently wrapped, and our writers were on hand to soak up the cinema bounty. Our second and final dispatch (find our first here) features some heavy, (seemingly) politically-minded films, including Bertrand Bonello’s festival fire-bomb Nocturama, which was rejected by both the Cannes and Venice film festivals; Gianfranco Rosi’s Fire at Sea, a documentary about the European migrant crisis; and Oliver Stone’s latest biopic, Snowden.…

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by InRO Staff Features Festival Coverage

Toronto Film Festival 2016 – Dispatch 1

September 23, 2016
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The 41st Toronto International Film Festival recently wrapped, and our writers were on hand to soak up the cinema bounty. Our first of two dispatches includes hotly anticipated fall releases like Denis Villeneuve’s mysterious sci-fi film Arrival and Barry Jenkins’s decades-spanning character study Moonlight; holdovers from the competition lineup of this year’s Cannes Film Festival, including Asghar Farhadi’s The Salesman, Christian Mungiu’s Graduation, and Jim Jarmusch’s Paterson; and a smattering of films looking to translate TIFF 2016 buzz to a wider audience, like actress Alice…

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by Sam C. Mac Features Retrospective Film

Retrospective | Sion Sono: Love Leaves Destruction in Its Wake

August 2, 2016
Play in Hell

Sion Sono, known to most as a director of brutally violent films like 2002’s Suicide Club, can claim at least three titles in his filmography that contain the word “love.” The best of these, and indeed the 54-year-old Japanese iconoclast’s masterpiece-to-date, is 2011’s Love Exposure, a four-hour exorcism of acrimonious attitudes toward his country’s relationship to religion, pornography, its youth, the obediences of family and class, and perhaps above all—and representative of each—the expectation of good taste.…

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