by InRO Staff

by InRO Staff Features Festival Coverage

New Directors/New Films 2017 – Dispatch 1

March 20, 2017
autumn autumn

The 46th edition of New Directors/New Films kicked off last Wednesday (March 15th) and ends this Sunday (March 24th). For our first of two dispatches from the festival, we look at a “cheeky” documentary about falconry; a “formally assured, but familiar” new film from It Felt Like Love director Eliza Hittman; a movie about Chinese immigrants in Argentina that is, appropriately, built around an understanding of language; Korean filmmaker Jang Woo-jin’s second feature, a reflection on “distance and longing”; and others. Check it…

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by InRO Staff Features

Top 10 Films of 2016

December 31, 2016
happy-hour

It’s heartening to realize that in a year of seemingly constant death—one in which the passing of great filmmakers was no exception—the best films here seemed intent on never forgetting those losses, to mine the past and the passed for new inspiration in the present, and in movingly reverent ways. Our great new filmmakers looked to the old ones to guide them…

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by InRO Staff Features

Top 10 Performances of 2016

December 30, 2016
lily

Our top 25 performances, before whittling it down to the 10 you’ll find below, featured votes for two actors from Manchester by the Sea, two from Toni Erdmann, four from Happy Hour, four from Certain Women, and a hefty five from Moonlight. A twist on a typical year’s voting trends which may…

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by InRO Staff Features

Top 10 Albums of 2016

December 29, 2016
chance

In a year most of us would rather forget for one reason or another, 2016 was welcomingly giving when it came to dispensing albums from some of both this and last century’s greatest performers. The sheer wealth of material this year means fantastic work like Leonard Cohen’s swan song, Young Thug’s most cohesive effort to date, and The Avalanches nearly two-decades-in-the-making second album won’t get the expanded…

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by InRO Staff Features

Top 10 Songs of 2016

December 29, 2016
formation

Just another year gone by—except songs seemed particularly vital for getting through these last 12 months. Not that you need me to tell you, but we lost some of our greatest purveyors of the form in 2016, and if the 10 selections below can’t compensate—if there’s no “Kiss” or “Mama Tried” or “Modern Love” among them—most look struggle, and sacrifice, and the indefatigable march of time, head-on, as much a reflection of their times as the classics that came before them. And if a few…

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by InRO Staff Features Festival Coverage

Toronto Film Festival 2016 – Dispatch 2

September 26, 2016
nocturama-banner

The 41st Toronto International Film Festival recently wrapped, and our writers were on hand to soak up the cinema bounty. Our second and final dispatch (find our first here) features some heavy, (seemingly) politically-minded films, including Bertrand Bonello’s festival fire-bomb Nocturama, which was rejected by both the Cannes and Venice film festivals; Gianfranco Rosi’s Fire at Sea, a documentary about the European migrant crisis; and Oliver Stone’s latest biopic, Snowden.…

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by InRO Staff Features Festival Coverage

Toronto Film Festival 2016 – Dispatch 1

September 23, 2016
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The 41st Toronto International Film Festival recently wrapped, and our writers were on hand to soak up the cinema bounty. Our first of two dispatches includes hotly anticipated fall releases like Denis Villeneuve’s mysterious sci-fi film Arrival and Barry Jenkins’s decades-spanning character study Moonlight; holdovers from the competition lineup of this year’s Cannes Film Festival, including Asghar Farhadi’s The Salesman, Christian Mungiu’s Graduation, and Jim Jarmusch’s Paterson; and a smattering of films looking to translate TIFF 2016 buzz to a wider audience, like actress Alice…

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by InRO Staff Features Festival Coverage

Japan Cuts 2016 – Dispatch 3

July 25, 2016
HUSH2

The 10th anniversary edition of Japan Cuts, North America’s largest festival for new Japanese film, wrapped this past weekend. Our third and final dispatch features a 2002 romantic comedy from Ryosuke Hashiguchi and a 1982 cyberpunk watershed from Sogo Ishii (both of which played as part of the “classics” sidebar); Masao Adachi’s latest political provocation…

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by InRO Staff Features Festival Coverage

Japan Cuts 2016 – Dispatch 2

July 21, 2016
shellcollector3

The 10th anniversary edition of Japan Cuts, North America’s largest festival for new Japanese film, runs from July 14th to the 24th, and we’re aiming to cover as many of the films in its program as we can. Our second dispatch features Junji Sakamoto’s new comedy; teen movies from Takeshi Ohne and Shiro Maeda; and Yoshifumi Tsubota’s adaptation of a Pulitzer Prize-winning author.…

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by InRO Staff Features Festival Coverage

Japan Cuts 2016 – Dispatch 1

July 14, 2016
Whispering Star

The 10th anniversary edition of Japan Cuts, North America’s largest festival for new Japanese film, runs from July 14th to the 24th, and we’re aiming to cover as many of the films in its program as we can. Our first dispatch features two new films from Sion Sono; a pitch-black movie industry comedy from Eiji Uchida; and Gakuryû Ishii’s goldfish fetish movie. Find the fest’s full schedule here.…

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by InRO Staff Features Festival Coverage

New York Asian Film Festival 2016

July 6, 2016
New York Asian Film Festival 2016

The New York Asian Film Festival is currently in the midst of its 15th year (it kicked off on June 22nd and will run until July 9th). As per usual, the festival represents one of the densest screening schedules of upcoming and repertory Asian cinema in the country, with a heavy emphasis on genre filmmaking: This year’s program includes the latest from Japanese horror master Kiyoshi Kurosawa…

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by InRO Staff Features

Top 10 Films of 2015

December 31, 2015
Top 10 Films of 2015

A typical year spent traversing the cinematic landscape results in straddling some kind of line: one foot confidently marches off into the future while the other remains firmly planted in the past. Innovation is an organic byproduct of any artform, but so is adherence to a certain classicism, and 2015 was particularly emblematic of this. On the one hand you have Steven Spielberg, delivering what has to be his most Spielbergian film in ages with Bridge of Spies, a subtly political but mostly humanist tale of ordinary…

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