Browsing Tag

Tsai Retro

by Daniel Gorman Film Retrospective

Sleeping on Dark Waters | Tsai Ming-liang

Given his relative renown amongst a certain type of adventurous, festival-savvy cinephile, interviews with Tsai Ming-liang tend to focus on either the ‘slowness’ of his films or their symbolic meanings. The short, behind-the-scenes documentary Sleeping on Dark Waters, released in 2008 but made from…

by Ayeen Forootan Film Retrospective

The Wayward Cloud | Tsai Ming-liang

Tsai Ming-liang’s cinema is primarily concerned with naifs and innocents, usually confronted with complex existential conditions, and with The Wayward Cloud (and arguably 2009’s Face, as well), the director offers a complete radicalization of such binary forces. Here, Tsai continues the narrative of sort-of…

by Paul Attard Film Retrospective

My Stinking Kid | Tsai Ming-liang

There’s something of a double bind that living with a disability provides in terms of individual identity and personal autonomy: that of either a desire to  simply exist outside of the context of any handicap or possession of an understanding that any sense of…

by Selina Lee Film Retrospective

Goodbye, Dragon Inn | Tsai Ming-liang

In 2003’s Goodbye, Dragon Inn, Tsai Ming-liang’s gentle ode to cinema, the Taiwanese director’s famously steady camera trains on a handful of moviegoers catching a late-night screening of wuxia classic Dragon Inn. Tsai’s funhouse mirror is subtle and suspenseful, and he carves out a…

by Lawrence Garcia Film Retrospective

The Hole | Tsai Ming-liang

In his essential Jerry Lewis essay “The Jerriad: A Clown Painting,” film critic B. Kite discusses the lineage of classic clowns like Chaplin, Keaton, and Laurel and Hardy, saying: “The great comedians are metaphysicians. Through their relations with space and interactions with the material…

by Matt McCracken Film Retrospective

The River | Tsai Ming-liang

Released in 1997, Tsai Ming-liang’s The River extended what would become a de facto family trilogy in which the same actors reprise identical roles within a particular domestic structure, with Rebels of the Neon God as the first entry and What Time Is It…

by Luke Gorham Film Retrospective

Vive L’amour | Tsai Ming-liang

In many ways, Tsai Ming-liang’s Vive L’amour follows (or establishes, given its chronological situation within his filmography) many of the director’s most characteristic tendencies. From the outset, wonky angles capture images in slight distortion; primary characters exhaust nearly half of the film’s runtime before…