Browsing Tag

2018

by InRO Staff Festival Coverage Film

BAMcinemafest 2018 – Dispatch 2

July 2, 2018
Support

The BAMcinemaFest wrapped its 10th edition earlier this week. We already covered some of the festival’s selections here. For our final dispatch, we look at a handful of strong documentaries from up and coming filmmakers, as well as a major new film from American indie film veteran Andrew Bujalski.…

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by InRO Staff Festival Coverage Film

BAMcinemafest 2018 – Dispatch 1

June 22, 2018
BAM1

The 2018 BAMcinemaFest, the 10th edition of the annual festival, kicked off Wednesday and runs until Sunday, July 1st. It has, over the last decade, established itself as one of the best, most daringly curated selections of American independent filmmaking that moviegoers could ask for, undoubtedly the borough’s perennial apogee for new cinema. This year’s slate is, unsurprisingly, replete with excellent films from exciting filmmakers, both neophytes and veterans, culling highlights from less consistent smorgasbords like Sundance (Madeline’s Madeline, Sorry to Bother You, Leave No Trace) and South…

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Blockbuster Beat by Matt Lynch Film

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom | J.A. Bayona

June 21, 2018

The first and certainly most beloved of the Jurassic Park films sums up the entire franchise with a single line, when Sam Neill’s Grant first sees a dinosaur and exclaims, “It’s a dinosaur!” Even when directed by a genuine master like Steven Spielberg (and especially when they’re not), these films always have a pretty low bar to clear. One can pine all they want for the sense of awe and wonder in the face of nature that was maybe evoked by…

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Blockbuster Beat by Daniel Gorman

Hereditary | Ari Aster

June 15, 2018
hereditary

No other company right now is playing the is-it-or-isn’t-is-a-horror-film game quite like A24. Blumhouse has their straightforward genre thrills down pat, with the occasional Purge film to expand their scope and dabble in some totally unsubtle social messaging. But A24, whether working in horror with sci-fi elements or horror as historical drama or horror with apocalyptic, mankind-is-the-real-enemy overtones has collected a roster of polished, deliberately scary arthouse films…

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Blockbuster Beat by Matt Lynch Film

Incredibles 2 | Brad Bird

June 13, 2018
Incredibles 2

In the 14 years since The Incredibles, the superpowered Parr family hasn’t aged a day. This sequel picks up right where the first film left off — except director Brad Bird has gotten older, and he sure feels a lot of ways about a lot of stuff. Bird is weirdly concerned with shifting gender roles, even though Elastigirl was basically the heroine of the first movie; he thinks an untrustworthy media is poisoning the judgment of the clueless masses…

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Blockbuster Beat by Matt Lynch Film

Deadpool 2 | David Leitch

May 17, 2018
deadpool

Did you like the first Deadpool? Its constant allegedly clever meta-references? The look-how-edgy-this-is shock humor? The graphic violence? Deadpool 2 has more of those things, so you will enjoy this one too. Although, this time, Deadpool (Ryan Reynolds) is depressed for various spoilery reasons and wants to die, just like Wolverine, only he can’t, just like Wolverine. So, again, just like Wolverine (he’s sort of obsessed with Wolverine), he throws himself into good deeds as a form of therapy and attempted absolution. In…

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Blockbuster Beat by Daniel Gorman Film

Tully | Jason Reitman

May 15, 2018
Tully

Too often Hollywood wants to project the idea of motherhood as an innately beautiful thing, all soft lighting and angelic babies cooing at their beatific mothers. Tully isn’t having any of that. Jason Reitman’s film instead begins by detailing the misery of motherhood in almost excruciating detail. It’s a bracingly realistic look at the exhaustion, the anger, the guilt and sheer exasperation of taking care of little human beings. Reitman is not a particularly…

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Blockbuster Beat by Daniel Gorman Film

Ready Player One | Steven Spielberg

May 1, 2018
Ready Player One

Now that the dust has settled and the hype machine has moved on to newer, bigger spectacles, let’s examine the reception of Steven Spielberg’s Ready Player One. Neither a runaway success nor a financial disaster, the film seems to have found the limits of a certain kind of nostalgia marketplace. The original novel has, by some accounts, had its popularity tarnished by the ensuing push-back against toxic masculinity in nerd culture — and that’s the biggest problem…

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by InRO Staff Festival Coverage Film

New Directors/New Films 2018 – Dispatch 2

April 9, 2018
drift2

The 47th edition of New Directors/New Films runs from Wednesday, March 28th, to Sunday, April 8th. For our final dispatch: a new feature from the co-director of Beyonce’s Lemonade film (Black Mother); the debut feature from “idiosyncratic” New York filmmaker Rick D’Ambrose (Notes on an Appearance); a film about “contemporary, post-colonial Algerian life” (Until the Birds Return); a werewolf film that’s also a class commentary (Good Manners); and more. Check out our first dispatch here. Across two features; several high-profile collaborations, including Beyonce’s Lemonade; and a widely…

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Blockbuster Beat by Matt Lynch Film

A Quiet Place | John Krasinski

April 6, 2018
qp

The opening of of A Quiet Place leaves you primed for an arthouse-inflected genre film, like something A24 would release, or that Alex Garland might direct. Shot with moody lighting and Malick-y closeups, a family silently raid an abandoned pharmacy, on what we’re informed is “Day 82” of something. All the actors sign their dialogue, and their big round eyes cringe at the slightest sound. But just as you start to worry that the whole film might be like this, all somber and serious, a little kid gets eaten by…

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by InRO Staff Festival Coverage Film

New Directors/New Films 2018 – Dispatch 1

March 30, 2018
Ava

The 47th edition of New Directors/New Films runs from Wednesday, March 28th, to Sunday, April 8th. For our first of two dispatches from the festival, we look at the FIPRESCI Discovery Prize winner at last year’s Toronto International Film Festival (Ava); the late Chinese director Hu Bo’s sole film, a 4-hour “exacting depiction of depression”; the “precisely controlled” second feature from Valérie Massadian (Milla); a Taiwanese independent filmmaker’s “meditation” on a “bleak sociopolitical system” (The Great Buddha+); and others. Look for our second dispatch from the festival next week. An Elephant…

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